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The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology

The Central Dogma (Bioinformation Theory) is

Although it is the genes in the nucleus of each cell that encode all the information a ssociated with each orgnism, it is the proteins in the cell cytoplasm that perform most life functions and make up the majority of cellular structures and serve catalytic purposes (enzymes).

Proteins are large, complex molecules made up of smaller subunits called amino acids. Chemical properties that distinguish the 20 different amino acids cause the protein chains to fold up into specific 3D structures that define their particular functions in the cell.

In an oversimplified version of this process, one gene encodes for one or more proteins and therefore the human genome defines the complement of all the expressed proteins of an individual - or the proteome.

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Gene Expression: Most genes are expressed as the proteins they encode in two steps:

Three types of RNAs:

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For more information, see these pages:


next up previous
Next: Gene expression and regulation Up: DNA, Genes and Genomes Previous: Codons and Amono Acids:
Ruye Wang 2015-04-27